Decolonizing Electronic Music Starts With Its Software

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I for one am very glad with the release of tools like Ableton’s Microtuner, which facilitate making music with a variety of “alternate” scales (to the default Western ones). Can’t quite believe it has taken this long!

Great to see microtuning built in to various hardware synths these days, too, like e.g. the Monologue, Minilogue and Minilogue XD.

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Highly recommend reading his essay on the history of tuning in electronic musical instruments - really important stuff: https://www.ctm-festival.de/magazine/microtonality-and-the-struggle-for-fretlessness-in-the-digital-age

He has a telegram channel for updates too: Telegram: Contact @khyamallami

Another thing I’ll add is that, if you’re in the market for a MIDI-CV converter that supports microtonality, the AvonSynth one supports MIDI Tuning Standard (MTS), which is talked about in the essay above. It’s really shocking how the tools for this sort of functionality have been around for yeeeeears but haven’t been widely implemented or talked about simply due to lack of care or consideration on the part of developers (and, of course, people’s biases and skewed impressions of markets).

This is a really good book that covers different cultural perceptions of electronic music tech and goes beyond just tuning stuff: Wired for Sound: Engineering and Technologies in Sonic Cultures.

Also, speaking of the monologue etc… there’s a good Aphex Twin & Tatsuya Takahashi interview from when it came out that briefly touches on some of this stuff IIRC

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Also, should probably add - I’ve been playing around with bitwig recently (thanks to @jet’s recommendation) and the on-screen keyboard allows a degree of microtonality though finger position, which I’ve personally found really fun and refreshing. Tbh I would probably pay a fair bit of money for a hardware version of that controller… (or is that sorta just the sensel morph/any ipad?) :laughing:

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